Aluminum   $ 2.1505 kg        |         Cobalt   $ 33.420 kg        |         Copper   $ 8.2940 kg        |         Gallium   $ 222.80 kg        |         Gold   $ 61736.51 kg        |         Indium   $ 284.50 kg        |         Iridium   $ 144678.36 kg        |         Iron Ore   $ 0.1083 kg        |         Lead   $ 2.1718 kg        |         Lithium   $ 29.821 kg        |         Molybdenum   $ 58.750 kg        |         Neodymium   $ 82.608 kg        |         Nickel   $ 20.616 kg        |         Palladium   $ 40303.53 kg        |         Platinum   $ 30972.89 kg        |         Rhodium   $ 131818.06 kg        |         Ruthenium   $ 14950.10 kg        |         Silver   $ 778.87 kg        |         Steel Rebar   $ 0.5063 kg        |         Tellurium   $ 73.354 kg        |         Tin   $ 25.497 kg        |         Uranium   $ 128.42 kg        |         Zinc   $ 2.3825 kg        |         
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A new agreement between Australia and the European Union (EU) aims to bolster the supply of critical minerals and technology, marking a significant step toward comprehensive free trade negotiations. Signed by Australian Trade Minister Don Farrell and Resources Minister Madeleine King, alongside EU Trade Commissioner Valdis Dombrovskis and Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton, the memorandum of understanding (MoU) focuses on several key areas of collaboration. The agreement outlines the establishment of talks between officials from both sides and enhanced information sharing, with a roadmap to be developed within six months. One of the primary goals is to attract European investment into Australian renewable energy projects. Senator Farrell emphasized the need for international capital to help Australia extract, process, and add value to its mineral resources. Key objectives include identifying and developing projects together, enhancing business links in the critical miner
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