Aluminum   $ 2.1505 kg        |         Cobalt   $ 33.420 kg        |         Copper   $ 8.2940 kg        |         Gallium   $ 222.80 kg        |         Gold   $ 61736.51 kg        |         Indium   $ 284.50 kg        |         Iridium   $ 144678.36 kg        |         Iron Ore   $ 0.1083 kg        |         Lead   $ 2.1718 kg        |         Lithium   $ 29.821 kg        |         Molybdenum   $ 58.750 kg        |         Neodymium   $ 82.608 kg        |         Nickel   $ 20.616 kg        |         Palladium   $ 40303.53 kg        |         Platinum   $ 30972.89 kg        |         Rhodium   $ 131818.06 kg        |         Ruthenium   $ 14950.10 kg        |         Silver   $ 778.87 kg        |         Steel Rebar   $ 0.5063 kg        |         Tellurium   $ 73.354 kg        |         Tin   $ 25.497 kg        |         Uranium   $ 128.42 kg        |         Zinc   $ 2.3825 kg        |         
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The city of Bishkek hosted an international conference titled “Water Deficit in Central Asia: Ways to Address Water Issues at Regional and International Levels.” Participants delved into pressing issues surrounding water scarcity in the region and explored prospects for resolution through interstate cooperation. Marat Imankulov, Secretary of the Security Council of the Kyrgyz Republic, highlighted the grim consensus among experts and international organizations, projecting a global water scarcity crisis within the next 25-30 years. By 2050, the planet may possess adequate hydro resources to sustain a population of nine billion, but their distribution will be uneven. Excessive environmental degradation and climate change will diminish water availability in many developing nations. According to UN reports, failure to conserve water resources promptly could leave over 5 billion people water insecure by 2050. World Bank analysts predict that by 2050, amidst a population surge in Central Asia to 90 million, water deficit may reach 25-30%. Moreover, the demand for water resources in agriculture could surge by 30% by 2030. Currently, Kyrgyzstan grapples with key challenges, including the reduction of accessible clean drinking water, significant wear and tear of water infrastructure, transboundary water management issues, and incomplete reforms in water governance.