Aluminum   $ 2.1505 kg        |         Cobalt   $ 33.420 kg        |         Copper   $ 8.2940 kg        |         Gallium   $ 222.80 kg        |         Gold   $ 61736.51 kg        |         Indium   $ 284.50 kg        |         Iridium   $ 144678.36 kg        |         Iron Ore   $ 0.1083 kg        |         Lead   $ 2.1718 kg        |         Lithium   $ 29.821 kg        |         Molybdenum   $ 58.750 kg        |         Neodymium   $ 82.608 kg        |         Nickel   $ 20.616 kg        |         Palladium   $ 40303.53 kg        |         Platinum   $ 30972.89 kg        |         Rhodium   $ 131818.06 kg        |         Ruthenium   $ 14950.10 kg        |         Silver   $ 778.87 kg        |         Steel Rebar   $ 0.5063 kg        |         Tellurium   $ 73.354 kg        |         Tin   $ 25.497 kg        |         Uranium   $ 128.42 kg        |         Zinc   $ 2.3825 kg        |         
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Recent developments in geological resource exploration have brought Central Asia to the forefront of global attention. With abundant mineral deposits lying beneath its surface, the region is set to play a pivotal role in the economic and geopolitical landscape. Nations like Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, long overlooked on the international stage, are now emerging as key players in the supply chain for critical raw materials crucial for the energy transition. The United States has notably extended support to facilitate mineral development in these countries, recognizing their significance in the global shift towards cleaner energy technologies. Rare earth elements, vital components across various industries, have been unearthed in substantial quantities, positioning Central Asia as a crucial hub for future resource extraction. Collaborative efforts between Central Asian governments and organizations like the United States Geological Survey are underway to map out and exploit these diverse mineral deposits. While Kazakhstan leads the region in rare earth reserves, other nations like Tajikistan and Uzbekistan are yet to fully explore and harness their geological potential.