Aluminum   $ 2.1505 kg        |         Cobalt   $ 33.420 kg        |         Copper   $ 8.2940 kg        |         Gallium   $ 222.80 kg        |         Gold   $ 61736.51 kg        |         Indium   $ 284.50 kg        |         Iridium   $ 144678.36 kg        |         Iron Ore   $ 0.1083 kg        |         Lead   $ 2.1718 kg        |         Lithium   $ 29.821 kg        |         Molybdenum   $ 58.750 kg        |         Neodymium   $ 82.608 kg        |         Nickel   $ 20.616 kg        |         Palladium   $ 40303.53 kg        |         Platinum   $ 30972.89 kg        |         Rhodium   $ 131818.06 kg        |         Ruthenium   $ 14950.10 kg        |         Silver   $ 778.87 kg        |         Steel Rebar   $ 0.5063 kg        |         Tellurium   $ 73.354 kg        |         Tin   $ 25.497 kg        |         Uranium   $ 128.42 kg        |         Zinc   $ 2.3825 kg        |         
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The U.S. House of Representatives has greenlit a ban on imports of Russian uranium, shedding light on America's reliance on foreign nuclear fuel. The bill, now pending Senate approval, amplifies discussions on energy security and geopolitical tensions. Visualizing U.S. Dependence on Russian Uranium: Utilizing data from the United States Energy Information Administration (EIA), we present a visual depiction of the extent to which the U.S. leans on Russian uranium imports, underscoring the significance of the legislative move. U.S. Uranium Suppliers and Global Dependencies: Despite sanctions imposed on Russian oil and gas post-Ukraine invasion, the U.S. continues to import Russian-enriched uranium, highlighting complex geopolitical dynamics. Russia stands as the principal foreign supplier of nuclear fuel to the U.S., with its imports fueling a substantial portion of America's commercial reactors. While European nations and the Urenco consortium contribute, a significant share of gl
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