Aluminum   $ 2.1505 kg        |         Cobalt   $ 33.420 kg        |         Copper   $ 8.2940 kg        |         Gallium   $ 222.80 kg        |         Gold   $ 61736.51 kg        |         Indium   $ 284.50 kg        |         Iridium   $ 144678.36 kg        |         Iron Ore   $ 0.1083 kg        |         Lead   $ 2.1718 kg        |         Lithium   $ 29.821 kg        |         Molybdenum   $ 58.750 kg        |         Neodymium   $ 82.608 kg        |         Nickel   $ 20.616 kg        |         Palladium   $ 40303.53 kg        |         Platinum   $ 30972.89 kg        |         Rhodium   $ 131818.06 kg        |         Ruthenium   $ 14950.10 kg        |         Silver   $ 778.87 kg        |         Steel Rebar   $ 0.5063 kg        |         Tellurium   $ 73.354 kg        |         Tin   $ 25.497 kg        |         Uranium   $ 128.42 kg        |         Zinc   $ 2.3825 kg        |         
Image source: https://pixelied.com/
Environmental activists interrupted a closed-doors conference on mineral resources in Belgrade, organised by international mining companies on November 7, in protest against mining pollution in the country. The organisers argue that mining is already damaging Serbia’s environment, and want to prevent major new mining projects going ahead. The main focus is on Rio Tinto’s plans to build a huge lithium mine in Serbia, which have already been blocked, but campaigners say the project has not been fully abandoned. Protesters broke into Belgrade’s Metropol hotel, where industry representatives were gathered, unfurled banners and disrupted the event by shouting out against mining in Serbia. Before breaking into the conference, representatives of environmental organisations addressed the media at a press conference outside the hotel. “Today, democracy was raw because it had to be,” said a statement on the Ecological Uprising movement’s Facebook page, saying that prote
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