Aluminum   $ 2.1505 kg        |         Cobalt   $ 33.420 kg        |         Copper   $ 8.2940 kg        |         Gallium   $ 222.80 kg        |         Gold   $ 61736.51 kg        |         Indium   $ 284.50 kg        |         Iridium   $ 144678.36 kg        |         Iron Ore   $ 0.1083 kg        |         Lead   $ 2.1718 kg        |         Lithium   $ 29.821 kg        |         Molybdenum   $ 58.750 kg        |         Neodymium   $ 82.608 kg        |         Nickel   $ 20.616 kg        |         Palladium   $ 40303.53 kg        |         Platinum   $ 30972.89 kg        |         Rhodium   $ 131818.06 kg        |         Ruthenium   $ 14950.10 kg        |         Silver   $ 778.87 kg        |         Steel Rebar   $ 0.5063 kg        |         Tellurium   $ 73.354 kg        |         Tin   $ 25.497 kg        |         Uranium   $ 128.42 kg        |         Zinc   $ 2.3825 kg        |         
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In her annual address to the European parliament, President Ursula von der Leyen announced that the European Union will initiate an anti-subsidy investigation into Chinese electric vehicles She expressed concern over the flood of cheaper Chinese electric cars in global markets, which are sustained by substantial state subsidies, leading to market distortion Von der Leyen specifically highlighted the predicament faced by European car manufacturers who are often undercut by competitors benefiting from these subsidies Given the high stakes and the challenging outlook, particularly for German mass market automakers like Volkswagen, it seems inevitable that measures such as tariffs or restrictions on Chinese carmakers' access to Europe will be imposed


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