Aluminum   $ 2.1505 kg        |         Cobalt   $ 33.420 kg        |         Copper   $ 8.2940 kg        |         Gallium   $ 222.80 kg        |         Gold   $ 61736.51 kg        |         Indium   $ 284.50 kg        |         Iridium   $ 144678.36 kg        |         Iron Ore   $ 0.1083 kg        |         Lead   $ 2.1718 kg        |         Lithium   $ 29.821 kg        |         Molybdenum   $ 58.750 kg        |         Neodymium   $ 82.608 kg        |         Nickel   $ 20.616 kg        |         Palladium   $ 40303.53 kg        |         Platinum   $ 30972.89 kg        |         Rhodium   $ 131818.06 kg        |         Ruthenium   $ 14950.10 kg        |         Silver   $ 778.87 kg        |         Steel Rebar   $ 0.5063 kg        |         Tellurium   $ 73.354 kg        |         Tin   $ 25.497 kg        |         Uranium   $ 128.42 kg        |         Zinc   $ 2.3825 kg        |         
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Polish coal miners have begun training in operating and servicing wind turbines as part of a programme to support workers leaving the mining sector.

Poland produces around 70% of its electricity from coal – the highest figure in the EU – but has plans to replace that share with renewables and nuclear over the next two decades. The energy transition has, however, caused concern among miners and their unions over what the future holds for them.

The two-week training – initiated and funded by EDF Renewables Polska, the biggest wind energy producer in Poland – is free for miners. The company hopes to help at least dozens of them move into new jobs.

“In the coming years, the wind energy industry will need tens of thousands of employees, while the specialised staff leaving the mining industry seems to be particularly prepared to find employment in the renewable energy sector after appropriate training,” said Alicja Chilińska-Zawadzka, general director at EDF Renewables Polska.